Monday, February 19, 2018

17 Wounds to America’s Heart Demand Moral Courage

A culture of violence indisputably exists in America.

This culture has manifested itself once again with the senseless loss of 17 lives in Parkland, Florida.

The continuous, merciless, and reprehensible loss of innocent lives must cease.

These losses throughout America, are inflicted among the most vulnerable of society, the youth in our schools and colleges.

Leadership, Vigilance, Collaboration

America must listen to the cries of anguish, agony, and suffering in our communities.

We must respond with a full-force ethical leadership, heightened vigilance, and relentless collaboration to make changes that are needed to stop the carnage.

Perhaps the reawakening of America, which has been the vision of my efforts over the last 20 years, needs additional inspiration. To this end, I humbly share these reflections from my mission statement:

“Inspired by the Sentinels of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, the mission of Reawakening America is to cultivate core values of moral courage, compassion, character, community, and perseverance throughout our country.

“All are called in share it this mission - students, parents, educators, administrators, counselors, law enforcement, emergency responders, community leaders, employees, our armed forces, employees, our armed forces, employers and government officials - in a unity of effort built on trust, honor, and respect.”

Parkland, Florida: Listen to Their Cries

America must pause to honor the lives gone too soon from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Our nation must be not allow their passing to be in vain, and be fully committed to transforming America from its culture of violence.

Alyssa Alhadeff, 14: a student who after being dropped off at school on that fateful day heard the words from her mom on Valentine ’s Day, “I love you.”

Scott Beigel, 35: a geography teacher who according to Kesley Friend, one of his students, saved her life. “Mr. Beigel was my hero and he still will be forever my hero. I will never forget the actions that he took for me and for my fellow students in the classroom. I am alive today because of him.”

Martin Duque Anguiano, 14: as remembered by his brother, “He was a very funny kid, outgoing, and sometimes really quiet. He was sweet and caring and loved by his family. Most of all, he was my baby brother.”

Nicholas Dworet, 17: an outstanding senior swimmer preparing for a bright future with the University of Indianapolis swim team who confirmed his recruitment.

Aaron Feis, 37: an assistant football coach killed after throwing himself in front of students to save their lives.

Jamie Guttenberg, 14: as detailed by her father on a Facebook post, “My heart is broken. Yesterday, Jennifer Bloom Gutenberg and I lost our baby girl to a violent shooting at her school. We lost our daughter and my son Jesse Guttenberg lost his sister.”

Chris Hixon, 49: a naval reservist who was deployed to Iraq in 2007 and served as the school athletic director. Chris was remembered by his widow Debra, “He loved being an American and serving his country and he instilled that in our kids.”

Luke Hoyer, 15: a relative remembered Luke by posting on Facebook that the family is “devastated by this senseless tragedy … our Luke was a precious child.”

Cara Loughran, 14: as posted by a neighbor Danny Vogel on Facebook, “RIP Cara, and fly with the angels. You will be greatly missed, and we will always love you and celebrate your beautiful life.”

Gina Montalto, 14: as memorialized by her aunt, Shawn Sherlock on Facebook, “I know somewhere in the heavens she’s designing the latest and greatest trends and has her art book she always carried with her as well.”

Joaquin Oliver, 17: as noted on Dec. 31 in his last Instagram post, Joaquin stated, “Thank you lord for putting a greater blessing then I could ever imagine into my life this past year. I love you with all my heart.”

Alaina Petty, 14: as detailed in a family statement, “While we will not have the opportunity to watch her grow up and become the amazing woman we know she would become, we are keeping an eternal perspective.”

Meadow Pollack, 18: a friend, Gll Lovito, posted on Facebook, “Please say a prayer for the family of an amazing girl I got to call my best friend growing up, Meadow Pollard, her life was taken way too soon and I have no words to describe how this feels. Rest in Peace my beautiful angel. You are and forever will be loved.”

Helena Ramsey, 17:
a family member, Curtis Page Jr., posted on Facebook, "Helena was a smart, kind hearted, and thoughtful person. She was deeply loved and loved others even more so. Though she was somewhat reserved, she had a relentless motivation towards her academic studies, and her soft warm demeanor brought the best out in all who knew her. She was so brilliant and witty, and I'm still wrestling with the idea that she is actually gone."

Alex Schachter, 14: a high school band member whose family set up a Go Fund Me scholarship fund in his memory, "In an effort to continue his memory, this scholarship is being created to help other students experience the joys of music as well as fund increased security at schools. Please help keep Alex's spirit alive."

Carmen Schentrup, 16: a National Merit Scholar semifinalist who was remembered in a tweet stating “Your family is forever in my thoughts and prayers. I am so sorry.”

Peter Wang, 15: a member of the ROTC program who was remembered by his classmate Kelsey Friend,"It's hard to not have him in the hallways anymore because me and him used to laugh with each other. He used to make me smile. And now he's gone."

Final Reflections

Voices of America’s youth are responding to the ongoing school violence with a unique, passionate, and collective clarion voice of moral courage.

The epicenter of these voices are from Parkland, Florida and they are serving as catalysts for youth to speak-up and act throughout America.

These voices are demanding change from glaciers of apathy, indifference, and incompetence. These young students deserve America’s undivided attention, as they represent the future of our nation, and have suffered unimaginable anguish.

America's youth deserve our leadership, encouragement, and empowerment to end the madness of this unleashed violence upon the innocents.

The deafening silence that takes place in America soon after past tragedies must change from indifference to resolve.

We must listen to the voices of America’s youth and respond with the commitment necessary to end the scourge of school violence and change the course of the nation.

Related Coverage:

American School Violence Requires a Response of Courage, Commitment, and Community

School Violence Crisis: America, Wake Up

America’s 21st Century Student: Character, Courage, Community

America’s Schools: Security, Character, Academics

Note Well:


Linkedin: Vincent J. Bove Consulting, Speaker Services, Publishing

Join Vincent’s Linkedin Group: The Sentinel: Reawakening the Nation

Facebook: Vincent J. Bove Consulting, Speaker Services, Publishing

Vincent is author of 250 articles, including his weekly column titled “Reawakening the Nation” for the Epoch Times; 35 countries, 21 languages, and growing. As a national speaker, he has addressed audiences nationwide on issues critical to America including ethical leadership, violence prevention, and crisis planning.

Photos

1. Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Parkland Florida victims. (Credit WPTV)
2. Melissa Shev visits a makeshift memorial setup in front of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in memory of the 17 people that were killed on Feb. 14, in Parkland, Florida, Florida on Feb. 20. 2018. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Breaking News: Parkland, Florida School Violence Calamity

Published reports indicate 17 dead at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School located in Parkland, Broward County, Florida.

"America must listen to the cries coming from Parkland, FL, and from communities throughout the nation that have suffered from tragedies.

"The school violence crisis will continue unless we respond collaboratively - law enforcement, schools, communities, students, families - with full force moral courage, compassion, and character.

"Our nation must not wait, once again, for the next school violence calamity. All must stand up and be counted as a dedicated member of the community, and get involved with our youth through the schools. Failure is not an option for the price is too great. We must prevail in taking back America from the culture of violence which has become so massive, heartbreaking, and pervasive.

"America, do not be desensitized through this continuous, reprehensible, and intensifying bombardment of violence. Become and remain outraged - respond with full force determination and reawaken the nation by resetting our moral compass." Vincent J. Bove

Read More:

American School Violence Requires a Response of Courage, Commitment, and Community

America’s Schools: Security, Character, Academics

School Violence Crisis: America, Wake Up

American Teachers: Inspire the Heart and Transform the Country

America’s 21st Century Student: Character, Courage, Community

(Photo Credit: Joel Auerbach/AP)

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Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Honoring America’s Fallen Police Officer Heroes

When a police officer is killed there is an eternal wound to the family, colleagues, community, and the heart of America.

The on-going dangers of protecting American communities continue with no end in sight.

According to the Officer Down Memorial Page, which honors all of law enforcement heroes who have fallen in the line of duty, 2018 has had a tragic start.

There are already fifteen line of duty deaths including a 9/11 related illness, automobile crashes, gunfire, and being struck by a vehicle.

Fallen Officers: Rest in Eternal Peace

All who have offered the ultimate sacrifice protecting and serving our communities deserve our eternal gratitude and heartfelt prayers.

We must also honor their memory with actions toward their loved ones that express honor, compassion, and dignity.

America would quickly deteriorate into anarchy, disorder, and chaos without these ethical protectors serving our communities.

Here are the names of America’s fallen officers who have died in 2018:

Police Officer Anthony Morelli, Westerville Division of Police, Ohio. End of Watch: Saturday, Feb. 10. Officer Morelli, 54 years-old, served for 29 years before being shot and killed after responding to a 911 hang-up call. He is survived by his wife and two children.

Police Officer Eric Joering, Westerville Division of Police, Ohio. End of Watch: Saturday, Feb. 10. Officer Joering, 39 years-old, served for 17 years and was killed by gunfire with Officer Anthony Morelli while responding to a 911 hang-up call. He is survived by his wife, four daughters, and his K-9 partner Sam.

Police Officer Chase Maddox, Locust Grove Police Department, Georgia. End of Watch: Friday, Feb. 10. Officer Maddox, 26 years-old, was shot and killed while assisting two deputies from the Henry County Sheriff’s Office serve a warrant. He had served his department for five years and is survived by his expectant wife and one child.

Police Officer David Sherrard, Richardson Police Department, Texas. End of Watch: Wednesday, Feb. 17. Officer Sherrard, 37 years-old, was shot and killed while responding to a disturbance at an apartment complex. He had served his department for 13 years and is survived by his wife and two daughters.

Reserve Officer Jarate Dewayen Condit, Ashen Police Department, Oklahoma. End of Watch: Tuesday, Feb. 6. Reserve Officer Condit, 23 years-old, was killed in a vehicle crash in route to mandatory training. He was also a volunteer firefighter and survived by his young child and parents.

Deputy Sheriff Steven Belanger, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, California. End of Watch: Tuesday, Feb. 6. Officer Belanger succumbed to a gunshot wound sustained on Dec. 10. 1994 when he was ambushed while conducting a traffic stop. At that time he was shot in the back of the head, and he remained confined to a wheelchair and in need of constant care for over 23 years until his passing. He is survived by his wife and daughter.

Deputy Sheriff Micah Flick, El Paso County Sheriff’s Office, Colorado. End of Watch: Monday, Feb. 5. Deputy Sheriff Micah, 34 years-old, was shot and killed while conducting an auto theft investigation. He was killed on the 11th anniversary of starting with his department and survived by his wife and 7 year-old twins.

Police Officer Glenn Anthony, Doss, Jr., Detroit Police Department, Michigan. End of Watch: Sunday, Jan. 28. Officer Doss Jr., 25 years-old, succumbed to a gunshot wound while responding to a domestic disturbance call. He had been with the Detroit Police Department for two years and is survived by his 9-month-old, girlfriend, and parents.

Deputy Sheriff Heath McDonald Gumm, Adams County Sheriff’s Office, Colorado. End of Watch: Wednesday, Jan. 24. Deputy Sheriff Gumm was shot and killed during a foot pursuit after responding to an assault in progress. He is survived by his wife, parents, sister, and grandmother.

Deputy U.S. Marshal Christopher David Hill, United States Marshals Service. End of Watch: Thursday, Jan. 18. Deputy U.S. Marshal Hill, 45 years-old, was shot and killed in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania while attempting to serve an arrest warrant. He was a U.S. Army veteran who had served the U.S. Marshals Service for 11 years. Deputy U.S. Marshal Hill is survived by his wife and two children.

Detective Michael R. Doty, York County Sheriff’s Office, South Carolina. End of Watch: Wednesday, Jan. 17. Detective Doty, 37 years-old, succumbed to gunshot wounds while searching for an armed and dangerous subject who had shot a York County Sheriff’s canine handler the day before. Detective Doty had served with the York County Sheriff’s Office for 12 years.

Deputy Sheriff Daniel A. McCartney, Pierce County Sheriff’s Office, Washington. End of Watch: Monday, Jan. 28. Deputy Sheriff McCartney, 34 years-old, was shot and killed while responding to a burglary in progress after engaging in foot pursuit of the subject. He was a U.S. Navy veteran who is survived by his wife and three sons.

Officer Chris Beaudion, Monroe Police Department, Louisiana. End of Watch: Jan. 7. While in his patrol car, Officer Beaudion, 26 years-old, was killed in a single vehicle crash causing him to suffer fatal injuries. He is survived by his wife, two children, and parents.

Lieutenant Christopher Robateau, Jersey City Police Department, New Jersey. End of Watch: Friday, Jan. 5. Lt. Robateau was struck and killed by a vehicle as he rendered assistance to another driver involved in an accident. He was in uniform and traveling to work when he was struck. Lt. Robateau is survived by his wife and three children.

Trooper Michael J. Anson, New York State Police, New York. End of Watch: Tuesday, Jan. 2. Trooper Anson, 56 years-old, died as a result of cancer that he developed following his 9/11 search and recovery efforts at the World Trade Center. He is survived by his wife, three children, and brothers.

Final Reflections

Each of these heroes protecting and serving our communities deserve America’s eternal gratitude, remembrance, and respect.

We must also be forever mindful of their families and support them with compassion, sensitivity, and dignity.

America is the land of the free and home of the brave because of these faithful servants.

We will forever honor them, and hold their families, friends, and law enforcement colleagues in our prayers.

Related Coverage:

Honoring Our Fallen Police, Firefighters, Military

National Police Week: Honoring Ethical Protectors

Dallas Police Tragedy: Healing, Unity, Renewal

Fallen Police Officers: Honoring American Sentinels

Note Well:

Linkedin: Vincent J. Bove Consulting, Speaker Services, Publishing

Join Vincent’s Linkedin Group: The Sentinel: Reawakening the Nation

Facebook: Vincent J. Bove Consulting, Speaker Services, Publishing

Vincent is author of 250 articles, including his weekly column titled “Reawakening the Nation” for the Epoch Times; 35 countries, 21 languages, and growing. As a national speaker, he has addressed audiences nationwide on issues critical to America including ethical leadership, violence prevention, and crisis planning.

Photos:

1. The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund candlelight vigil, May 13, 2016, National Mall, Washington D.C. (Courtesy FBI)
2. Officer Anthony Morelli, Westerville Division of Police. (Courtesy Westerville Division of Police, Ohio)

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Thursday, February 08, 2018

Empowering America’s Police to Serve as Ethical Protectors

It has been an honor for me to serve American law enforcement over the last 20 years with presentations and published works.

These works have addressed critical issues including leadership development, violence prevention, and crisis management.

The heart of my service has been ethical policing, critical to the law enforcement profession.

Ethical training and development must be the foundation for all who take the solemn oath to protect and serve.

The challenges of contemporary policing demand that we empower America’s law enforcement professionals with the resources needed for standing on ethical pillars.

Protecting the Shield, Safeguarding Communities

In my home state of New Jersey, there was a recent published series addressing police misconduct.

The series was based on investigative research that examined the price paid by the public when bad cops remain on local police forces.

The series alleged that New Jersey governments throughout the state, “from the smallest towns to some of the largest cities, have spent at least $42.7 million this decade to cover-up deaths, physical abuses, and sexual misconduct at the hands of bad cops.”

The publication also alleged that the abuses have left a staggering toll with at least 19 dead, 131 injured, 7 sexual transgressions, dozens of false arrests, and harassment offenses.

According to the series, in many cases local police departments were aware of, or even tolerated abuse and that damage is concealed by secret settlements and nondisclosure agreements to silence victims of abuse.

Highlighting Ethical Policing

Before continuing with honestly addressing unethical issues through training and development initiatives, let us accentuate the positive.

The overwhelming majority of America’s law enforcement professionals stand on ethical principles.

There are hundreds of thousands serving in the admirable law enforcement profession who exemplify ethical conduct through countless daily acts of professionalism, courtesy, and honor.

Some of the recent headlines memorializing the ethical foundation of our law enforcement profession include the following:

• US Marshall from York County ‘died a hero’ in Harrisburg shooting; dad of 2 was Army vet

• Hospitalized officer who risked life during icy pond rescue says he’s not a hero

• ‘True hero’ Detroit police officer Glenn Doss Jr killed responding to emergency call

• Days after Narcan training, St. Paul police officer saves a woman suffering overdose

• Columbus police officer saves woman from freezing pond

• Indiana officer saves child’s life first day on the job

• Heroic St. Joseph County police officer save woman from fiery car

Law Enforcement Code of Ethics

According to the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), the law enforcement code of ethics stands as a “preface to the mission and commitment law enforcement agencies make to the public they serve.”

The code of ethics, as documented on the IACP website begins with these principles:

“As a law enforcement officer, my fundamental duty is to serve the community; to safeguard lives and property; to protect the innocent against deception, the weak against oppression or intimidation and the peaceful against violence or disorder; and to respect the constitutional rights of all to liberty, equality and justice.

“I will keep my private life unsullied as an example to all and will behave in a manner that does not bring discredit to me or to my agency. I will maintain courageous calm in the face of danger, scorn or ridicule; develop self-restraint; and be constantly mindful of the welfare of others. Honest in thought and deed both in my personal and official life, I will be exemplary in obeying the law and the regulations of my department. Whatever I see or hear of a confidential nature or that is confided to me in my official capacity will be kept ever secret unless revelation is necessary in the performance of my duty.”

Empowering Ethical Protectors

Just this week, I had the privilege of discussing implementing my program titled “21st Century Policing: America’s Ethical Protectors” with the top brass of a major law enforcement agency.

The agency is be commended for recognizing that ethical training is critical to their vision, mission, and core values.

Ethical training and development is also critical to the entire law enforcement profession, and so I am taking the liberty to share some details from my program.

By doing so, it is my fervent hope that law enforcement agencies nationwide are inspired to make on-going ethical policing initiatives that include certification programs as fundamental to their mission.

My program abstract specifies the following:

First-rate law enforcement agencies recognize that a respectable program on ethical policing stands as the hallmark for professionalism for reasons including the following:

• Ethical policing training and development is a proven educational model that strengthens operational efficiency, improves morale, and increases respectability.

• Ethics empowers the rank-and-file of an agency with leadership skills, vigilance enhancement, and collaborative expertise.

• It addresses state-of-the-art ethical principles based upon recognized issues vital to the profession. This is the most effective way of developing, attaining, and sustaining the vision, mission, and core values of the agency.

• It will strengthen agency accountability and improve community trust through principles that honor expectations, performance, and responsibility.

• Ethical training assists in limiting the agency’s liability as it demonstrates that ethical training has been conducted by an independent respected authority.

The program, already conducted for an intiative of the Bergen County Police Chiefs Association (BCPCA), Bergen County Prosecutors Office (BCPC), and Bergen County Sheriff’s Office (BCSO), has an agenda that includes the following:

• Ethical policing principles

• Principles of American Policing

• Emotional Intelligence

• Cultivating a reputation of respect

• Building community trust

• Neighborhood Policing

• Sexual harassment

• Crime prevention

• Communication skills

• Mental health

• Conflict resolution

• Crisis management

Final Reflections

America’s law enforcement professionals are in critical roles of protecting and serving our communities.

We must recognize, appreciate, and support them in their challenging work. We must also realize our shared responsibility and do everything in our power to forge iron-clad police-community partnerships.

These partnerships must be built on an ethical code, essential not only to law enforcement professionals, but on every community member privileged to call America home.

Related Coverage:

21st Century Policing: America’s Ethical Guardians

Principles of American Policing

Policing Requires Ethical Protectors

NYPD Mission: Terminate, Train, Transform

Photos:

1. Police officers from various agencies listening to a boy attending the Livingston Police Department National Night Out, Aug. 7, 2013. (Vincent J. Bove)
2. Jack Hoban, president of Resolution Group International (RGI), delivers his presentation at the “21st Century Policing: America’s Ethical Guardians” conference at the Bergen County Law and Public Safety Institute, in Mahwah, N.J., on Oct. 4, 2016. (Vincent J. Bove)

Note Well:


Linkedin: Vincent J. Bove Consulting, Speaker Services, Publishing
Join Vincent’s Linkedin Group: The Sentinel: Reawakening the Nation

Facebook: Vincent J. Bove Consulting, Speaker Services, Publishing

Vincent is author of 250 articles, including his weekly column titled “Reawakening the Nation” for the Epoch Times; 35 countries, 21 languages, and growing. As a national speaker, he has addressed audiences nationwide on issues critical to America including ethical leadership, violence prevention, and crisis planning.

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Monday, January 29, 2018

American School Violence Requires a Response of Courage, Commitment, and Community

America must pause to reverently honor the lives of two beloved high school students gone too soon.

These 15-year-old students from Marshall County High School in Benton, Kentucky were the latest victims of our school violence crisis, dead at the hands of a 15-year-old gunman.

The two students knew each other since kindergarten where they sat right beside one another. They grew up together, continually interacting with each other in their tight-knit community.

Bailey Nicole Holt was described by her aunt as the “salt of the earth.” Bailey loved wearing jeans, listening to classic rock, and college sports.

Preston Ryan Cope was on the school baseball team and loved the St. Louis Cardinals. Preston was described by a family spokesperson as “caring, compassionate, with a gentle spirit, and the biggest heart.”

America must pray for their families, friends, communities, classmates, and the 18 other victims of the tragedy.

We must also be fully dedicated to ending these tragedies through courage, commitment, and community.

Listen To Their Cries: America’s Clarion Call

America must listen to the cries coming from Kentucky, and from communities throughout the nation that have suffered from tragedies.

The school violence crisis will continue unless we respond collaboratively.

America must not wait for the next school violence tragedy. It is time to stand up and be counted as a dedicated member of the community and get involved with our youth through the schools. Failure is not an option for the price is too great. We must prevail in taking back America from the culture of violence which has become so massive, heartbreaking, and pervasive.

America must not be desensitized through a continuous, reprehensible, and intensifying bombardment of violence. We must become and remain outraged and respond with full force determination and reawaken to a nation with a clear moral compass.

Our nation has suffered for too many years with a crisis of leadership. We must dedicate ourselves to a renewal of character, courage, and compassion for a transformation of America, only possible through our homes and in our schools.

Preventing Violence: Empowering Communities

Just a few day prior to the Benton, Kentucky tragedy I addressed 100 members of the Bergen County Police Chiefs Association (BCPCA) on Jan. 18 in Old Tappan, New Jersey. My remarks on school violence prevention crystalized my presentations and published works since the Columbine tragedy in 1999.

Although many programs are essential for a comprehensive school violence prevention program, these quick tips were shared with the BCPCA as critical initiatives for American schools:

• School Vulnerability Assessments (SVA): these must be conducted by reputable, board certified professionals in security. They are much more comprehensive than security surveys and cover all issues relative to the school including physical, personal, and procedural security. The importance of interviewing members throughout the school community is essential to the SVA. These include administrators, mental health professionals, teachers, students, parents, school bus drivers, and vendors.

• Professional Development Programs: these programs are important for all staff members and must include coaches, parents, cafeteria personnel, and all involved with the school. It should involve insights from U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Secret Service documents on school security that include Early Warning Timely Response: A Guide to Safe Schools, Practical Information on Crisis Planning: A Guide for Safe Schools and Communities, Helping Your Child Become a Responsible Citizen, The Final Report And Findings Of The Safe School Initiative: Implications For The Prevention Of School Attacks In The United States, Threat Assessment in Schools: A Guide To Managing Threatening Situations And To Creating Safe School Climates, and Character Education: Our Shared Responsibility.

• Character Development Initiatives for Students: Schools must provide the leadership to instill a culture of character. Character is critical to America and we will only transform the nation from a culture of violence when it’s importance is consistent, exemplified, and rewarded in our schools.

• School Resource Officers (SRO): The document, “To Protect & Educate: The School Resource Officer and the Prevention of Violence in Schools,” published by the National Association of School Resource Officers (NASRO) is recommended. The SRO is a priceless component of violence prevention and character education for our schools. This community policing initiative affords the opportunity not only for violence prevention and education but also promotes a positive rapport between law enforcement and students. Schools should do everything possible to have an SRO program and law enforcement should be fully committed with the most qualified, trained, certified, and dedicated professionals available.

Other important elements for school security include board certified security directors, bullying prevention programs, crisis management teams, threat assessment teams, and updated emergency plans that are practiced with the entire school community.

Broken Communities: Lessons Learned

According to a published report in 2006, there were at least 25 security personnel protecting John McDonogh High School in New Orleans due to grave security concerns.

Many of the students at the school lived on their own or with other students since their parents were displaced due to Hurricane Katrina. The displacement had become a powder keg for anger continually manifested through violence.

During the first six weeks of the 2006 school year, a teacher and security guard were brutally beaten by students and hospitalized. Many other students attacked other security personnel, teachers, and a police officer. Over 20 students of the 775 faced expulsion and another 50 had already been suspended. The principal stated there were fights every day and there were six very serious assaults.

The grave security concerns at the high school where students displaced from their families were caught up in a battlefield of fights, assaults, and a dangerously distressing atmosphere offers a profound insight into the need for community. Whenever there is community brokenness, whether it is the community of the family, neighborhood, school, town, or city itself, this breakdown can contribute to inappropriate acting-out that includes numerous degrees of violence.

Community is part of the internal ticking clock of the human condition and vital for personal growth, health, safety, and welfare. Each and every human being is inherently social by nature. In light of this social dimension, the concept of community policing, such as the SRO program, and initiatives that build community, is critical for school violence prevention.

Final Reflections

America must turn the tide from this scourge of school violence.

We must build on the pillars of courage, commitment, and community to secure our schools.

Every educational community must be fully dedicated to this mission and inspire our youth with a bright future for America, full of hope, security, and character.

Read More:

America’s Schools: Security, Character, Academics

School Violence Crisis: America, Wake Up

American Teachers: Inspire the Heart and Transform the Country

America’s 21st Century Student: Character, Courage, Community

Note Well:

Linkedin: Vincent J. Bove Consulting, Speaker Services, Publishing

Join Vincent’s Linkedin Group: The Sentinel: Reawakening the Nation

Facebook: Vincent J. Bove Consulting, Speaker Services, Publishing

Vincent is author of 250 articles, including his weekly column titled “Reawakening the Nation” for the Epoch Times; 35 countries, 21 languages, and growing. As a national speaker, he has addressed audiences nationwide on issues critical to America including ethical leadership, violence prevention, and crisis planning.

Photos:

1. Students attend a prayer vigil for students killed and injured after a 15-year-old boy opened fire with a handgun at Marshall County High School, at Life in Christ Church in Marion, Kentucky on Jan. 23, 2018. (REUTERS/Harrison McClary)
2. Stewart Walker attends a prayer vigil for students killed and injured after a 15-year-old boy opened fire with a handgun at Marshall County High School, at Life in Christ Church in Marion, Kentucky on January 23, 2018. (REUTERS/Harrison McClary)
3. Washington School, Union City Public Schools, New Jersey, Feb. 27, 2009. (Vincent J. Bove)
4. School Resource Officer with students. (Courtesy of Aurora City, Colorado)

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Wednesday, January 24, 2018

American Veteran Suicide Crisis Demands Ethical Leadership

Patriotism is expressed in many ways, but honoring the men and women who serve in our armed forces is the preeminent hallmark of love for one's country.

Military service is a sacrifice that expresses devotion to our nation. This service deserves dignity, honor, and gratitude of all privileged to call America home.

America honors military service, and especially the ultimate sacrifice, on Veterans Day and Memorial Day.

But every day, we must have a profound respect for our military. Their sacrifices, service, and commitment are critical for safeguarding our democracy, freedom, and way of life.

American Veterans Deserve Dignity

The American flag is the sacred symbol of our nation and deserves our unwavering respect.

As our flag flies throughout our land, at schools, workplaces, parades, homes, landmarks, parks, and streets, it is a sacrosanct reminder of the sacrifices of our armed forces.

As we honor our flag, we are reminded to remember all our veterans, especially those who suffer from the trails ignited by challenges during their service. We must have empathy that assists them in their time of need.

America’s veterans are experiencing a suicide crisis. We must respond with character, compassion, and commitment to alleviate their suffering.

A sense of immediate urgency to the veteran suicide crisis is the clarion call to America.

Veteran Suicide Tragedies: Time for Action

Although there are countless expressions of compassion by dedicated individuals in our veteran’s hospitals, there are well documented deficiencies.

These words, attributed to Abraham Lincoln, are therefore applicable to concerns with our veterans:

“He has a right to criticize, who has a heart to help.”

A few years ago, there was a shocking and well-documented medical scandal that scorched the conscience of America.

The travesty of treatment delays for veterans needing medical attention was a blistering commentary on the leadership crisis of America.

Although these published reports are no longer making headline news, the continual tragedies of treatment delays, compounded by veteran suicides must ignite our consciences.

America must respond with a heart of moral decency and not allow these injustices to continue.

Any injustice against our veterans in need of mental health treatment must ignite the soul of America to action.

In one heartbreaking story, a veteran, Byron Wade Earles tried to commit suicide on Nov. 7, 2016 after a veteran’s administration hospital denied him admission.

Just two months later, Earles died by suicide on Jan. 6, 2017.

According to published reports, a mental health worker had turned him away not believing his claim of a suicide attempt.

His death highlights America’s crisis memorialized in a history of published reports of deficiencies at veteran’s hospitals.

In another tragic story, Peter Kaiser, a 76-year-old veteran committed suicide in the parking lot of the Northport Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Northport, New York. His suicide took place after allegedly being denied service at the center.

A published report quoted an anonymous hospital worker who stated that the veteran “went to the E.R. and was denied service … and then he went to his car and shot himself.”

Heart Wrenching Statistics: Red Flags

In one study by the Department of Veterans Affairs, statistics on our veteran suicide crisis are heart wrenching.

The study cites a staggering 22 deaths per day – or one every 65 minutes on average. This study covered veteran’s suicides from 1999 to 2010 and indicated that 69 percent of suicides were among individuals aged 50 years or older.

In other statistics documented by the Team Veteran Foundation website, nearly 137,000 veterans have died by suicide since 2001.

The website details these red flags that demand intervention when someone is contemplating suicide:

• Talking or discussions about wanting to die
• Researching ways to kill oneself
• References to hopelessness or feeling as if life has no purpose
• Feelings of being trapped or in unbearable pain
• Feelings of being a burden to others
• Increased alcohol or drug use
• Sleep changes; either excessive sleep or insomnia
• Isolation and withdrawal
• Expressions of rage or a desire to seek revenge
• Anxiety, agitation or recklessness
• Extreme mood swings
• Giving away important personal items or pets

Final Reflections

America’s veteran suicide crisis demands our moral leadership, empathy, and action.

Our response must take place through every segment of society and must include our youth, as they are the future of the nation.

One inspirational example of America’s youth responding to the suicide crisis was from two Traverse City high schools in Grand Traverse County, Michigan.

On Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, students from these high schools presented a $13,000.00 check to a veteran suicide prevention group at half-time during a basketball game.

The students raised the money when their schools competed against one another during their Traverse City Patriot Game a few months earlier.

These students, through their character, compassion, and concern for the veterans give America great hope for our future.

May each of us be inspired by their example and be fully committed to caring for our veterans through prayer, words, and actions.

Read More:

America’s Veterans Deserve Honor, Homes, Health Care

America’s Veterans: Honoring Our Heroes

Armed Forces: Honor, Leadership, Protecting America

America’s Military Suicide Crisis: Awareness, Compassion, Prevention

Note Well:

Linkedin: Vincent J. Bove Consulting, Speaker Services, Publishing

Join Vincent’s Linkedin Group: The Sentinel: Reawakening the Nation

Facebook: Vincent J. Bove Consulting, Speaker Services, Publishing

Vincent is author of 250 articles, including his weekly column titled “Reawakening the Nation” for the Epoch Times; 35 countries, 21 languages, and growing. As a national speaker, he has addressed audiences nationwide on issues critical to America including ethical leadership, violence prevention, and crisis planning.

Photos

1. A military officer being consoled. (Credit Team Veteran Foundation)
2. An American veteran and Purple Heart Recipient on Fifth Avenue during New York City’s Veterans Day Parade on Nov. 11, 2011. (Vincent J. Bove)
3. Veteran Jose Gonzalez pauses at the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in New York City during the Memorial Day Observation on Monday, May 26, 2014. Gonzalez served in Vietnam 1968–1972. (Vincent J. Bove)
4. 22 Veterans suicides each day. (Credit military.com)
5. Homeless man sleeping with posted veteran sign, 31st Street between 6th and 7th avenue, New York City, Nov. 21, 2015. (Vincent J. Bove)

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Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Portraits of American Character Help Reawaken the Nation

Character must be the heartbeat of America.

This virtue is critical to the reawakening of the nation.

It is the quality represents the ideals of the nation and the goodness of humanity.

Each person that is honored to call America home must continually reflect on living a life of character.

We must also have our eyes wide open and appreciate all who reflect the ideals of character in our society.

Diamond in the Rough

The term “diamond in the rough” is sometimes applied to an individual with hidden qualities that have not yet been polished to stand out.

A diamond in the rough is often a person who appears harsh. Yet, with some polishing this person can be developed to express acts of charity, benevolence, and compassion.

In my opinion, the term can also be applied to individuals who stand out as portraits of character in a society that can at times be callous, indifferent, and superficial.

As rough as the culture may appear, these individuals shine like diamonds, and their character has the power to illuminate, inspire, and reawaken society.

America must pause to reflect on the critical importance of character. We must also always appreciate the diamonds of moral decency that represent “the better angels of our nature.”

America’s Character Personified

Lt. Christopher Robateau, 49, Jersey City Police Department (JCPD): On Friday morning, January 5, 2018, Lt. Robateau died after being struck by a vehicle on the New Jersey Turnpike. Lt. Robateau, in full uniform, was on his way to work when he left his vehicle to check on the welfare of someone involved in an accident.

The JCPD Chief responded to this tragedy by stating, “Lt. Robateau’s instincts are always to help and save others and that’s what he was doing when he was struck.”

Lt. Robateau served the JCPD for 23 years. He is survived by his wife and three children.

On the Officer Down Memorial Page website that honors all law enforcement heroes, an outpouring of sympathy was expressed.

Perhaps these words from a retired JCPD colleague who served with Lt. Robateau can help to understand the pain of losing this great man:

“This is a tremendous loss to the JCPD family. Chris was a great cop, a better human being, a loving husband and father.”

Private First Class Emanuel Mensah, New York Army National Guard: On Dec. 28, 2017, Pfc. Emanuel Mensah was visiting home for the holidays after completing military training in Virginia. While home, he died in a massive fire at an apartment building in the Bronx after being credited with saving four lives.

He returned into the building to help save additional lives but was unable to escape the fire.

Mensah was a permanent legal resident, whose family immigrated to America from Ghana.

This heroic soldier will be posthumously awarded the Soldiers Medal – the Army’s highest award for heroism occurring outside of battle.

According to his recruiter, Staff Sgt. Reuben Martinez-Ortiz, Mensah represented the ideals of our armed forces.

“I knew from the moment I met him his heart was as big as our National Guard family,” Martinez-Ortiz said. “He was ready to serve our nation and community. Pfc. Mensah was the embodiment of what our Army Values stand for.”

2nd Lt. Alix Schoelcher Idrache: An official United States Military Academy (USMA) news release on Jul. 30, 2015 announcing leadership positions for cadets cited Idrache being appointed as the 1st Regimental Commander.

Lt. General Robert L. Caslen, Jr., the USMA superintendent stated in the announcement that all cadets being appointed, which included Idrache, “represent the best of all of us … as our mission here is to develop leaders of character.”

When the Haiti-born cadet cried while standing alongside over 950 of his classmates during his West Point graduation ceremony, the photo of his emotional outpouring went viral.

As a response to the photo, the statement Idrache released on Facebook captures the character that Lt. General Caslen referred to:

“I am from Haiti and never did I imagine that such honor would be one day bestowed on me. The second is where I am. Men and women who have preserved the very essence of the human condition stood in that position and took the same oath. Men who preserved the Union is a dark period of this country’s history. Men who scaled the face of adversity and liberated Europe from fascism and nazism. Women like CPT Griest, LT Haver, MAJ Jaster who rewrote the narrative and challenged the status quo to prove themselves worthy of being called Rangers.”

Speaking of his future, Idrache added:

“The third is my future. Shortly after leave, I will report to FT. Rucker to start flight school. Knowing that one day I will be a pilot is humbling beyond words. I could not help but be flooded with emotions knowing that I will be leading these men and women who are willing to give their all to preserve what we value as the American way of life. To me, that is the greatest honor. Once again, thank you.”

Final Reflections

Despite the challenges of our times, there are diamonds of character among us that represent the ideals of America.

May all of us be true to character as it is the virtue that will inspire the reawakening of the nation.

Note Well:

Linkedin: Vincent J. Bove Consulting, Speaker Services, Publishing

Join Vincent’s Linkedin Group: The Sentinel: Reawakening the Nation

Facebook: Vincent J. Bove Consulting, Speaker Services, Publishing

Vincent is author of 250 articles, including his weekly column titled “Reawakening the Nation” for the Epoch Times; 35 countries, 21 languages, and growing. As a national speaker, he has addressed audiences nationwide on issues critical to America including ethical leadership, violence prevention, and crisis planning.

Read More:

We the People Demand Character in American Government

The Personality of American Leadership

American Government Requires Ethical Leadership

America’s Corrupt Culture Beckons Ethical Renaissance

Photos:

1. Lt. Christopher Robateau, Jersey City Police Department. (Courtesy JCPD)

2. Private First Class Emanuel Mensah, New York Army National Guard. (Photo Credit New York Army National Guard Recruiting and Retention Battalion )

3. 2nd Lt. Alix Schoelcher Idrache cries during the United States Military Academy West Point Graduation, May 23, 2016. (Photo Credit U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Vito T. Bryant)

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Wednesday, January 10, 2018

NYPD Neighborhood Policing Must Intensify as Crime Records Plunge

America would quickly decay into chaos, lawlessness, and anarchy without dedicated police protecting and serving our communities.

Yet, policing is inseparable from police-community partnerships. This unity of effort is essential to our way of life and we must be fully committed to enhancing this collaboration.

Every person privileged to call America home must be dedicated to police-community unity.

Our communities must intensify their commitment to the Nine Principles of American Policing to enhance trust between police and communities.

The first of these Nine Principles captures the heart of 21st century American policing:

“Being pro-police and pro-community are inseparable, indefatigable, and pre-eminent.”

The NYPD: America’s Largest Police Department

As detailed on the official New York City government website, “The New York City Police Department (NYPD) is the largest and one of the oldest municipal police departments in the United States, with approximately 36,000 officers and 18,000 civilian employees.

“The NYPD was established in 1845, and today, is responsible for policing an 8.5-million-person city, by performing a wide variety of public safety, law enforcement, traffic management, counterterror, and emergency response roles. In the past 25 years, the department has achieved spectacular declines in both violent and property crime, ensuring that New York City has the lowest overall rate of major crimes in the 25 largest cities in the country.”

NYPD Mission Requires Community Partnerships

The mission of the New York City Police Department is to “enhance the quality of life in New York City by working in partnership with the community to enforce the law, preserve peace, reduce fear, and maintain order. The Department is committed to accomplishing its mission of protecting the lives and property of all citizens of New York City by treating every citizen with compassion, courtesy, professionalism, and respect, while efficiently rendering police services and enforcing the laws impartially, by fighting crime both through deterrence and the relentless pursuit of criminals.”

To conduct this mission, the NYPD is comprised of enforcement, investigations, and administrative bureaus.

Throughout New York City, there are 77 precincts comprised of patrol officers and detectives. There are also 12 transit districts designed to protect nearly six-million daily subway patrons, as well as nine police service areas protecting over 400,000 public housing residents.

Police-Community Collaboration: Crime Plummets

As one born and raised in the Bronx, there is a profound appreciation for the plummeting crime reduction benchmarks taking place in New York City.

At the close of 2017, the NYPD cites preliminary statistics that are cause for all New Yorkers to appreciate, and for the nation to take notice.

These statistics are highlighted by the following:

• The first time the total number of index crimes has fallen below 100,000.
• The first time the number of shooting incidents has fallen below 800.
• The first time the total number of murders has fallen below 300. This reduction in murders has resulted in the lowest per-capita murder rate in nearly 70 years.

As a response to this extraordinary success, Police Commissioner James P. O’Neill captured the heart of Neighborhood Policing, which is critical to reducing crime through police-community partnerships.

O’Neill stated “Crime in New York City has reached a new low … the murder rate has not been lower since the Korean War … we will continue deepening relationships with the public, emphasizing the shared responsibility we have to our safety. I am confident we can do more. And we will.”

THE NYPD: A Recap

During the last five years, my articles for the Epoch Times have included policing as topics critical to America.

These articles have included many on the NYPD, which in my opinion is the world’s most renowned police department.

As we begin a new year, a reflection of some highlights from these articles is worthy of review, particularly since they stress principles complementary to Neighborhood Policing.

NYC Terror Incidents Demand Police-Community Unity, Dec. 13, 2107: “Our country’s dedication to a continual collaboration of our police and communities will be the heart of protecting New York City and our nation. This dedication is critical to safeguarding our way of life and deserves our full force dedication.”

Neighborhood Policing Illuminates NYPD Mission, Sept. 15, 2017: “The NYPD with its Neighborhood Policing program is contributing to the Reawakening of the Nation.

The program is reducing crime in New York City, and serves as a model for enhancing pro-police and pro-community partnerships nationwide.”

NYPD Leaders Exemplify Courtesy, Professionalism, Respect, Mar. 23, 2017: “During a moment with Commissioner O’Neill on March 21, after his presentation for the American Academy for Professional Law Enforcement (AAPLE), I asked him for an explanation of the difference between community policing and neighborhood-based policing.

“O’Neill stressed that neighborhood-based policing demands more accountability from the officer. The officer not only develops partnerships with the community but assumes an ownership of responsibility.”

NYPD Counterterrorism: Protecting New York City, Nov. 17, 2016: “The NYPD is dedicated to protecting New York City but all of us must work together.

“This is our country and these are our communities that deserve security, safety, and protection.

“Each of us has a responsibility to have our eyes wide open, enhance our unity of effort, and to live by the mantra, “If you see something, say something.”

Precision Policing: Respecting Our Citizens’ Dignity, Aug. 18, 2016: “As witnessed with controversies, tensions, and problems throughout America, there is a clarion call to enhance police-community relations.

“America must rise to the occasion and ignite a 21st century policing mindset that is built on the pillars of trust, ethics, transparency, and accountability.

“When our nation dedicates itself to enhancing police-community partnerships, and is inspired by the qualities of leadership, vigilance, and collaboration, we will be on the path to reawakening the nation.”

NYPD Renaissance Cops: Safe and Fair Everywhere, Apr. 24, 2016: “The NYPD being the nation’s largest department and the world’s most renowned has the opportunity to revolutionize policing.”

Paris Terror, New Yorkers, and Vigilance, Apr. 24, 2016: “A complete dedication to protect and serve by the NYPD in collaboration with all people is mission critical. Each New Yorker shares the responsibility to exercise leadership, vigilance, and collaboration with the police.”

NYPD, Inspire America: Courtesy, Respect, Community, Jan. 2, 2015: “Policing is an honorable profession but the badge does not guarantee respect, it must be earned and maintained by ethical behavior.

“Police–community relations is the heart of community life. America must rise to the occasion through authentic, respectful actions, never through dishonorable behavior that only builds walls of distrust and contempt.”

NYPD Mission: Terminate, Train, Transform, Dec. 12, 2014: “Police–community cooperation is impossible without trust built on character, ethics, and leadership. These qualities are critical not only to the NYPD but also to police departments all over America.

“The NYPD must be a catalyst for transformation and play a critical role in reawakening the nation by enhancing police–community cooperation.”

Transforming the NYPD: Terminating Toxic Police Officers, Oct. 10, 2104: “The heart of sound law enforcement philosophy is based on the rock-solid Nine Principles of Policing by Sir Robert Peel.

“These principles are summarized by the saying “the police and the people are one” and the thought that effective policing mandates “pubic approval of police existence, actions and behavior.”

NYPD Culture Shift: Enhancing Community Partnerships, Sept. 19, 2014: “The ethical dimension of law enforcement is critical and must be the heart of every police officer.

“The NYPD will be organizationally transformative with building trust in communities when ethical development, accountability, and transparency are the heart of training initiatives.

“The results of the NYPD vision will be a high performance department that cultivates integrity, integrates public safety with citizen rights; enhances crime prevention, diversity, and mutual trust; and showcases the NYPD as a police-community model for reawakening the nation.”

NYPD Mission: Develop 35,000 Ethical Protectors, Aug. 1, 2014: “As the world’s most renowned law enforcement agency, the NYPD must rise to the occasion. Their development of enhanced training initiatives, including cultivating certified ethical protectors, community partnerships, public-private initiatives, and the timeless principles of Sir Robert Peel, are worthy of full-force dedication and will serve as a model to law enforcement agencies worldwide.”

NYPD SHIELD: America’s Public-Private Collaboration Model, Jul. 25, 2014: “This teamwork can be called collaboration, cooperation, or partnership but unequivocally it is a unity of effort between the public and private sector. This cohesiveness is essential for America’s security.”

The Police and The People: A Unity of Effort, Mar. 14, 2014: “A police department is most effective when dedicated to properly upholding community policing, which promotes a unity of effort between the police and the people. This collaboration is critical to New York City and to communities across the globe.”

Final Reflections

The NYPD, and all New Yorkers in collaboration with their efforts to protect and serve deserve praise for the reduction of crime in the city.

Yet, these are challenging times in New York and throughout America. We must continue to be vigilant and remain increasingly dedicated to a unity effort to protect our communities and cherished way of life.

Related Coverage:

The State of Policing in the United States: Issues and Response


21st Century America Requires Police–Community Unity

American Policing: Restoring Trust, Building Community

Police-Community Collaboration: America’s Public Safety Lifeline

Note Well:

Linkedin: Vincent J. Bove Consulting, Speaker Services, Publishing

Join Vincent’s Linkedin Group: The Sentinel: Reawakening the Nation

Facebook: Vincent J. Bove Consulting, Speaker Services, Publishing

Vincent is author of 250 articles, including his weekly column titled “Reawakening the Nation” for the Epoch Times; 35 countries, 21 languages, and growing. As a national speaker, he has addressed audiences nationwide on issues critical to America including ethical leadership, violence prevention, and crisis planning.

Photos:

1. NYPD officers interact with a community merchant. (Courtesy NYPD news)
2. NYPD conversing with commuter. (Courtesy NYPD news)

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Thursday, January 04, 2018

Honoring Our Fallen Police, Firefighters, Military

America must forever honor all of our fallen police, firefighters, and military.

These individuals who have offered the ultimate sacrifice protecting our communities and our nation deserve our eternal respect.

The clarion call of Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg must be seared into the soul of each person privileged to call America home.

The Gettysburg address, written for the fallen military during the Civil War, is eternally applicable to all who protect and serve America:

“It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us, that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion; that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom; and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the Earth.”

America’s Fallen Police: A Deadly 2017

According to statistics memorialized on the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF) the perils of law enforcement service continues.

Preliminary data compiled by the NLEOMF as of Dec. 28, 2017, cite 128 federal, state, and local law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty in 2017.

Texas led the list of fatalities with 14, followed by New York and Florida, both with 9, and California with 7.

Forty-seven officers were killed in traffic-related incidents. Firearms-related fatalities were the second-leading cause with 44 officers shot and killed.

The remaining officers died as a result of causes including job-related cardiac events, drownings, being beaten to death, a helicopter crash, and as a result of an illness contracted during 9/11 rescue and recovery efforts.

Let us pause to solemnly honor some who have offered the ultimate sacrifice:

Highway Patrol Officer Andrew Camilleri, California Highway Patrol, End of Watch (EOW): 12/24/2017: Highway Patrol Officer Andrew Camilleri was killed when his patrol car was struck from behind by an impaired driver.
Police Officer Marcus McNeil, New Orleans Police Department, EOW: 10/13/2017: Police Officer Marcus McNeil was shot while investigating suspicious activity.
Sergeant Meggan Lee Callahan, North Carolina Dept. of Public Safety-Division of Prisons EOW: 4/26/2017: Sergeant Meggan Lee Callahan was assaulted and killed by an inmate serving a life sentence for a previous murder.

National Fallen Firefighters Memorial

The dangers of serving America’s communities as a firefighter are enshrined on a wall of honor at the National Fallen Firefighters Memorial in Emmetsburg, Maryland.

At this memorial is an eternal flame symbolizing the spirit of firefighters.

Plaques encircle the monument with the names of fallen firefighters.

The U.S. Fire Administration website documents the names of ninety-three firefighters killed in the line of duty in 2017.

One recent tragedy was Cory Iverson who died from burns and smoke on Dec. 16, 2017.

Iverson, a member of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection’s San Diego unit was fighting the Thomas Fire, one of the largest in California history.

This heroic firefighter is survived by his wife, a 2-year-old daughter, and another daughter on the way this spring.

Iverson’s tragedy is mystically connected with every fallen firefighter.

Aside from the tragedies such as Iverson’s inflicted upon the firefighter community, honor must be eternal for all involved with the 9/11 tragedy.

Although 343 firefighters died on that fateful day, the FDNY has lost over 150 additional firefighters.

These fallen “bravest of the brave” have died due to illnesses associated with fighting the fires and rescue operations at ground zero.

It is estimate that over 1,000 firefighters are now suffering from illnesses associated with 9/11.

America’s Fallen Military Heroes

Each year America honors our fallen military heroes on Memorial Day.

But the honor due to all fallen members of our armed forces must be forever seared into the soul of every American.

According to the Military Times website, some of our recently fallen military personnel, who along with fallen law enforcement and firefighters, represent the best of our nation, include the following:

Army Sgt. 1st Class Stephen B. Cribben, Died November 4, 2017 Serving During Operation Freedom’s Sentinel: Cribben, 33, of Simi Valley, California, died Nov. 4 in Logar province, Afghanistan, as a result of wounds sustained while engaged in combat operations. He was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group.
Army Sgt. La David T. Johnson, Died October 4, 2017 Serving During U.S. Africa Command Operations: Johnson, 25, of Miami Gardens, Florida, died Oct. 4 in southwest Niger, as a result of enemy fire. He was assigned to 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The incident is under investigation.
Army Staff Sgt Aaron R. Butler, Died August 16, 2017 Serving During Operation Freedom’s Sentinel: Butler, 27, of Monticello, Utah, died Aug. 16 in Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered from an improvised explosive device while conducting combat operations. He was assigned to the 19th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Camp Williams, Utah. The incident is under investigation.

Final Reflections

America’s heart must eternally reflect compassion, respect, and honor for all our fallen.

The call to serve America as an ethical protector through the sacrosanct police, firefighter, and military professions deserves our nation’s perpetual honor.

There is a mystical unity with all who have offered the ultimate sacrifice for America, and all who honor their memory in their souls.

All who serve America, and especially those who have offered the ultimate sacrifice represent the character of our great nation.

May all of our fallen be eternally honored for each of them epitomize the immortal words that “there is no greater love than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends.” (John 15:13)

Read More:

Fallen Officers Demand America’s Compassion, Vigilance, Unity

America’s Fallen Military Deserve Eternal Honor

National Police Week: Honoring Ethical Protectors

Gold Star Families: Honoring Those Who Make the Ultimate Sacrifice

Note Well:

Linkedin: Vincent J. Bove Consulting, Speaker Services, Publishing

Join Vincent’s Linkedin Group: The Sentinel: Reawakening the Nation

Facebook: Vincent J. Bove Consulting, Speaker Services, Publishing

Vincent is author of 250 articles, including his weekly column titled “Reawakening the Nation” for the Epoch Times; 35 countries, 21 languages, and growing. As a national speaker, he has addressed audiences nationwide on issues critical to America including ethical leadership, violence prevention, and crisis planning.

Photos:

1. An NYPD Sergeant at prayer in Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Brooklyn on June 26, 2017. A memorial mass was held honoring NYPD Transit Bureau officers who died in the line of duty. NYPD executives, members of the Transit Bureau, and loved ones gathered to remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice. The names of 36 fallen officers were read during the mass as attendees prayed for their families. All of the most recent officers being recognized died due to illnesses contracted while working at Ground Zero. (Courtesy NYPD news)

2. FDNY honoring the 343 fallen firefighters who perished during 9/11, Veterans Day Parade, Fifth Avenue, NYC, Nov. 12, 2011. (Vincent J. Bove)

3. Interment Ceremony procession of Lt. Mark H. Dooley at his final resting place in Arlington National Cemetery on July 13, 2007. (Vincent J. Bove)

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Wednesday, December 27, 2017

U.S. Marshals Service: Protect, Defend, Enforce

According to a program report titled “National Sources of Law Enforcement Employment Data” by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, the FBI estimates approximately 18,000 law enforcement agencies exist in America.

This information is gleaned from the number of agencies that report annual data to the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program.

This program has been administered by the FBI since 1930. The UCR involves voluntary reporting of crimes known to law enforcement, as well as arrest information, and law enforcement employee data.

Insightful information on crime and law enforcement can be viewed from the UCR. But, for the purpose of this article, let us notice the extensive law enforcement network dedicated to protecting and serving America.

Many of these agencies, as well as issues critical to American policing, have been highlighted in my articles for the Epoch Times and also my presentations throughout the United States.

In this article, I would like to highlight the United States Marshals Service (USMS) and honor their pivotal role in safeguarding America.

Protect, Defend, Enforce

Since the USMS was America’s first federal law enforcement agency, established in 1789, it is considered the nation’s police force.

As detailed in the USMS Strategic Plan: 2012-2018, “The USMS protects the judicial process; the cornerstone of American democracy. Providing federal judicial security; apprehending fugitives and non-compliant sex offenders; securing and transporting federal prisoners from arrest to incarceration; executing federal court orders; seizing and managing assets acquired through illegal means; and assuring the safety of endangered government witnesses and their families is our mission. The USMS uses this influence and reach gained through its accomplished history and broad authority to collaborate with other federal, state, local, and international law enforcement agencies, as well as with concerned citizens and members of the judiciary, to form a united front against crime.”

The mission of the USMS is “to protect, defend, and enforce the American justice system.”

Their vision is “a world class law enforcement agency—unified in our mission and workforce; professional and agile, with modernized tools and capabilities; strategically building upon our status as a trusted partner by achieving the highest levels of effectiveness, efficiency, safety, and security.”

Collaboration, Critical to the Mission

The extensive network of the USMS is expressed through a geographical structure that mirrors the structure of the United States district courts.

There are 94 federal judicial districts in each state, the District of Columbia, and Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

Let us focus on two USMS districts, where I have been privileged to personally know the U.S. Marshal’s for each district.

U.S. Marshal Juan Mattos, Jr., whom I have been privileged to know for over 20 years, serves as the United States Marshal for the District of New Jersey.

Marshal Mattos and I first met in 2006 prior to my keynote titled “American Leadership Principles for Law Enforcement.” The keynote was delivered for the West Point Command and Leadership Graduation.

This program, under the auspices of the New Jersey State Association of Chiefs of Police (NJSACOP) was dedicated to developing future law enforcement leaders.

At that event, and at numerous FBI and other law enforcement initiatives over the years, I was always impressed by the professionalism, respectability, and dignity of Mattos.

Now at brief look at his district.

Aside from fundamental information on the USMS District of New Jersey website, a success story crystalizes their collaborative effort with arresting dangerous felons.

In one incident, members of the USMS New York/New Jersey Regional Fugitive Task Force, Newark Division, arrested an individual wanted by the Bureau of Alcohol and Tobacco on charges of being a convicted felon in possession of a weapon.

The outcome, without their intervention with successfully apprehending this individual, could have been another horrid headline.

Now, let us move from the USMS district of New Jersey to New York State.

In New York State, the USMS is divided into four judicial districts, referred to as the Northern, Southern, Eastern, and Western Districts of New York.

Since I have been privileged to know U.S. Marshal Michael Greco, who provides leadership for the Southern District of New York, let us take a view of his district.

Marshal Greco and I have met at numerous programs over the last few years, including events for the National Law Enforcement Associates, National Law Enforcement Foundation, ASIS International, and the First Precinct Financial Area Security Council.

On two occasions I had the privilege of attending Marshal Greco’s presentations on the USMS. His loyalty, commitment, and dedication to his profession was inspirational.

The USMS Southern District comprises the counties of Bronx, Dutchess, New York, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Sullivan, Westchester, and concurrently with the Eastern District, the waters within the Eastern District.

In one of the countless success stories exemplifying collaboration, a fugitive wanted on outstanding homicide charges out of the United Kingdom was arrested by a team of U.S. Marshals and Task Force Officers from the New York/New Jersey Regional Fugitive Task Force in the Southern District of New York.

Final Reflections

There were two television shows that I remember from my childhood in the 1960’s that dramatized the legacy of the USMS.

One show portrayed Wyatt Earp, an iconic frontiersman from the glorified American West.

Wyatt Earp was a deputy town marshal in Tombstone, Arizona Territory. Earp was known as soft-spoken but with nerves of steel. Perhaps he is best remembered for taking part in a gunfight at the O.K. Corral during which lawmen killed three outlaw cowboys in 1881.

Although many aspects of Earp’s life are clouded by myth, he did serve the USMS as a deputy marshal.

In another show, Bat Masterson, a lawman, gunfighter, and well-known Old West character was portrayed.

The USMS cites Bat Masterson as one who began wearing their renowned star-shaped badge around 1880. His service began in Kansas with a subsequent move to Arizona.

Masterson was well-known for his dandy dress and being a sharpshooter. After serving the USMS out West, Masterson then moved to New York, serving the Southern District from 1905-1909.

Yet, beyond the legendary portrayals of Hollywood, the USMS is vital to the security of America.

Their service is exemplified through outstanding public servants Michael Greco and Juan Mattos, Jr., their U.S. Marshal colleagues, and approximately 3,700 deputy U.S. Marshals and criminal investigators who protect and serve America.

Our nation’s law enforcement agencies, in collaboration with private security professionals, our armed forces, and dedicated community members are critical to safeguarding our homeland.

As we honor the USMS, and all dedicated to protecting and serving America, let us intensify our dedication to a unity of effort.

These are challenging times that demand our leadership, vigilance, and collaboration, and we must commit ourselves to partnerships throughout all of society.

This unity of effort is inseparable from the USMS mission. This mission beckons us to protect, defend, and enforce the values of our justice system, all of which complement the security of our nation.

Photos:
1. U.S. Marshal briefing for Operation Falcon (Federal And Local Cops Organized Nationally), on June 16, 2008. The U.S. Marshals teamed with its partners from federal, state, and local law enforcement to engage in the record-breaking initiative. It was the fifth effort in a continuing series of historically successful national fugitive apprehension missions, which have resulted in the collective capture of more than 55,800 dangerous fugitive felons. (Courtesy U.S. Marshal Service)
2. Two members of the USMS arrest a suspect, July 16, 2008. (Courtesy U.S. Marshal Service)
3. U.S. Marshal Michael Greco, Vincent J. Bove, U.S. Marshal Juan Mattos Jr., at an National Law Enforcement Associates event, Dec. 8, 2017. (Courtesy Vincent J. Bove Publishing)
4. Dodge City Peace Commission, early June, 1883. This file is actually uploaded under an incorrect name: *police* commission, not peace commission. But the men photographed went to Dodge threatening a war, so the title of "peace commission" (later applied to the photo) was originally tongue-in-cheek. And doubly ironic, since the presence of this much force did indeed historically result in a peaceful resolution, with no violence. According to a biography of Wyatt Earp by Casey Tefertiller, the photo was taken in the Conkling Studio at Dodge City in June 1883 and first appeared in the National Police Gazette on 21 July, 1883. From left to right, standing: W.H. Harris, Luke Short, Bat Masterson, W.F. Petillon. Seated: Charlie Bassett, Wyatt Earp, Frank McLain (possibly "M. C. Clark". (Public Domain: Dodge City Peace Commission)

Read More:

Policing Requires Ethical Protectors

The State of Policing in the United States: Issues and Response

Police-Community Collaboration: America’s Public Safety Lifeline

21st Century Policing: America’s Ethical Guardians

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Vincent is author of 250 articles, including his weekly column titled “Reawakening the Nation” for the Epoch Times; 35 countries, 21 languages, and growing. As a national speaker, he has addressed audiences nationwide on issues critical to America including ethical leadership, violence prevention, and crisis planning.

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